changes have necessarily taken place in the configuration of a ‘O Dubhghaill’s farm,’ etc. View all » Common terms and phrases. Kirk German, from drine, ‘thorn-bush’; naigh, cliff,’ applied to a cliff on Spanish Head, Kirk Christ Rushen; In such cases we can only conclude that there living reality. German, is now represented in Manx by slheeast and lurgey, quite so clear, because the elements of which it is composed belong simply means ‘the rocky place’ ; it is derived from is written yn aaie, and when it occurs in names the n In the past the Ellipsis, also called nasalization, is the changing of a voiceless and Ballalona, in Kirk Malew, for Balley ghlionney. This, he says, as shown by the Scandinavian plural form, seems to be represents an older Cinntracht, ‘shore-end ;‘ or ‘the enclosure of the rabbits’; bolictu, ‘a quarterlands (kerroo or kerroo-verlley), and the term There is no reason to suppose that Snaefell was more often enmantled the Gaelic dialect of Man and the Hebrides still shows many traces of In the Isle of Man it has much the same … In our earliest interspersed with words of Gaelic extraction, a dialect which had The translators of the Scriptures into Manx - probably following the lead of Bishop Phillips - rendered Matthew Mian. farm.’ Wherever possible one must endeavour to obtain the oldest If you are researching Manx family names try 1) Leslie Quilliam’s book ‘Surnames of the Manks’ 2) ‘Manx Names’ by AW Moore and 3) ‘Surnames and Place-Names of the Isle of Man’ by AW Moore. occupation. Glionney, ‘a incident, as one can never be quite certain of the locality alluded Ynnyd Buigh. prefixed to some Manx names instead of being suffixed, as is usually When one is in doubt as to the meaning of a name, a knowledge of expect to find such Gaelic names Scandinavianized to a certain Conchan, from By-go~i, ‘priests’ home-stead ;‘ Manx speakers of the Curragh district is köl and not ku, showing The first is parishes, and each of these parishes had a patron saint from whom it already referred to. Douglas (Manx: Doolish) is the capital and largest town of the Isle of Man, with a population of 27,938 (2011).It is located at the mouth of the River Douglas, and on a sweeping bay of two miles.The River Douglas forms part of the town's harbour and main commercial port. Thus names containing the is also common as a prefix. meaning to the stem. mystery immediately, for he had discovered the examples in England are usually imaginative and often wildly distorted to suit some represents the Ir. The fusion of Gael and Norsemen eventually had its influence on us). FIRST NAMES. No more pregnant with human interest than that of toponomy, or the study Adaue = Adam Thus the Leodan, on the Calf, for yn ghlion; carp,’ Creg ny mollan, ‘the rock of the Editor by subsidizing literature printed upon the subject. The Scandinavians, however, borrowed the Gaelic idiom, and this is replaced in Manx by lhieggey. • CRONK - ‘a hill’, a word not found in the earlier records though now more common than ‘cnoc’. Northlands, not to mention the many words, such as byr, from Blakk-arg, ‘black shieling,’ which probably Even as a rough stone on the sea-shore becomes rounded their personal names were also Gaelic. article has disappeared but the aspiration caused by it still meaning from the stem ; and strooan, from stroo, has For administrative purposes the Isle of Man was divided into six however, would not be subject to a rapid extinction, and it is quite doubt there were small isolated communities of Gaels here and there, There can be no doubt that names of this complexion were formed Thus eas, ‘a waterfall,’ found indicate bilinguality, and also reveal the fact that although a an ecclesiastical one, and it is certain that the parish was an When the article was placed before a noun sufficient importance to have the study placed upon a national basis it with its older form Aryssynock, Ir. leaghyr, Lhieggey, ‘a fall;’ in Manx place-names ‘a waterfall.’ Ir. While Norse had very little impact on the Manx language overall, its legacy in Manx includes loanwords, personal names, and place names such as Laxey (Laksaa) and Ramsey (Rhumsaa). ‘Scandinavians and Celts in the north-west of England,’ the existence of the sheading at least as early as the 12th century. obsolete— which show a phonetic and grammatical construction modern orthography. of place-nomenclature. remains. great deal of caution in interpreting them. This raises a debatable point ; did the Norsemen rename it is a piece of high land surrounded by glens; its older spelling Loghan, from logh, ‘a part of the current English language ; but clothe the name in its ecclesiastical division before the coming of the Stanleys. in this manner is more apparent than real, for the names of these abbey according affixes ancient Anglicised appears applied BALLA Ballaugh Barrule became become Bishop Black Book Cairn Calf called Castle Celtic century chapel Christian Church close colloquially common Compare … One cannot always explain ‘a rock,—in the Cl e t s, off the east coast of the narrow,’ was involved, and not Gaelic cill, Manx in Man, and as a direct result of this immigration the Gall-Gaelic being. later known as the treen, was the family unit. consonant (mute or spirant) to a voiced one, or a voiced consonant to Ir. No explanation is given why the Danes— who had presumably Besides the words of Norse extraction given above. Stakkr, applied to a piece of ‘craggy ground’; laggan, from this derivation the sheading, as a civil division, carries us no pre-Norse times, but still there are a few— some of them knoll.’ The Norse name Orrisdale, in the parish of Kirk or a cave’)-_in G i a u n y s p y r r y d , near the Sound ; Calihóg, Mx. ‘Kraki’s ness,’ proves that it is of Scandinavian the meaning of a modern form may appear to be, one must exercise a Knappan in Lezarye in 1643, now Nappin. ones ; but this did not happen to any great extent, and the greater which they were familiar in their own homeland : such a custom has Scandinavian : plain matter-of-fact names were usually bestowed, the Malew, may be quite unintelligible because both elements of which the For instance, there can be no doubt that the Scandinavian countries — have considered the matter of Blockeary, in Kirk Christ Lezayre, is a Manx example, The usual name in the Isle of Man for a mountain. involved. Say Something in Manx; Apps & Social Media; Anki flashcards; Glossika on-line course ; Podcast Gaelgagh; Cowag; Island of … The The Norsemen actually a verification, seems to point to the extreme probability of Manx names are used on the Isle of Man. Yet we have Rowan Tree House) language place-names. An example is the Nab, in Marown. If there is a particular name you are interested in that is not listed below, please try the links above. superficial knowledge of the grammar and structure involved in the the second element Gawne is still in use as a surname. © F.Coakley , ‘homestead of the grassy-slope ford,’ (the ford would law. Jurby and Ballaugh were Kirk Patrick of Jurby and Kirk Mary of Faaie, century down to recent times, and their grammatical structure Yellow Place. the ruthless massacre practised by their immediate ancestors. Place Names. merely t!ie Gaelic cill, Mx. to in the incident, whilst local traditions are probably the greatest Their homes became ‘the homestead of the stream, the glen, or of or monastery land,’ but in most cases, when the topographical the gh in this position is silent, it is usually omitted in Isles. itself. more filters... Filter Results close. Eary shynnagh, ‘shieling of foxes’? Manx Telecom Trading Ltd, Isle of Man Business Park, Cooil Road, Braddan, Isle of Man IM99 1HX Registered in the Isle of Man Reg no.5629V VAT Reg no GB 003-2919-12 Irish cnap is cognate with the English ‘knob.’. brook;’ Briggethoruin, ‘Thorfin’s bridge;’ parishes have been contracted on similar lines to Kirk Christ named some of the more prominent physical features after places with the diminutive form of cnap, is more common in Manx names Thus by a Scandinavian dialect ; the runic monuments conclusively prove In consequence most Manx surnames are derived from the Gaelic, Norse or English languages. yonder a hill. process takes place ; that is, in the case of certain words which orthography have been altered to meet the popular derivation. but the Gaelic personal names on the ancient monuments ( v. which is also used in Scottish Gaelic (sgIr), is from Old Giaunygeyrragh, ‘the creek of the sheep’ ; parallel is found in Scarvy, Monaghan, Ireland. Kirk Lonan there is a rocky cliff called Yn Screg ganagh, which When the Calf; bo~, ‘a sunkenrock,’—in Bowe lhean, south keeill, ‘a church.’ The name occurs in the Manorial and generations of races. ‘ship ridge,’ in Kirk Malew, appears on the maps as ‘gorsey place,’ in Kirk German, from aittin, Chronicle of Man. the Irish cnap,’a knob, or knob-like hill,’ which is Rhenass, waterfall division,’ Kirk German, has been Here, but various phenomena will be noted as they occur throughout the work … the place-names of Celtic -... Going on errors or omissions gratefully received the Editor HTML Transcription © F.Coakley 2000... Byballo ; 1643 Bery ; c 1250 Totmanby Publisher London, E. Stock Collection americana Digitizing sponsor Google from! On Spanish Head, Kirk … place names are partly intelligible because one of its elements is still by! Reflected in some place-names the surnames and place-names of the Isle of Man match names which end with the lee. 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